Rio 2016: How did the Refugee Olympic Team do?

The Refugee Olympic Team has made history by being the first of its kind.

They arrived at the Olympic Athlete’s village on Aug. 3, two days before the Opening Ceremonies, to cheers, dancing and music, according the official Rio 2016 website.

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Though none of them have won medals, most of them say the chance to compete at the Olympics is enough. Here’s a look at how the athletes have done:

Paulo Amotun competes in the Men’s 1500m heats on Day 11 of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games at the Olympic Stadium on August 16, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Photo by Cameron Spencer/Getty Images

Paulo Amotun, athletics

Paulo Amotun was formerly from South Sudan, and has been training in Kenya. He  competed in the men’s 1500-metres on Tuesday, Aug. 21. Amotun posted a time of 4:03.96 seconds but didn’t qualify for the semi-finals.

“I was one of those refugees there in the camp, and now I have reached somewhere special,” he told the UNHCR in June. “If I perform well, I will use that to help support my family, and my people.”

Rami Anis of the Refugee Olympic Team reacts after the Men’s 100m Freestyle heat on Day 4 of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games at the Olympic Aquatics Stadium on August 9, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Photo by Clive Rose/Getty Images

Rami Anis, swimming

Rami Anis didn’t qualify for the men’s 100m freestyle on Tues. Aug. 9. Though the Syrian finished sixth in his heat, the crowd cheered loudly for him, making him the star of the pool.

He also came 40th in the 100m butterfly

“It’s wonderful to be the star of an event like this, at which refugees have drawn so much attention,” Anis said after his race, rio2016长沙桑拿 reports.

“This is a dream and I don’t want to wake up too soon.”

Yiech Pur Biel of the Olympic Refugee Team talks while attending a press conference given by the Olympic Refugee Team on July 31, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Photo by Ker Robertson/Getty Images

Yiech Pur Biel, athletics

Yiech Pur Biel came to the refugee team from South Sudan and he finished last in the men’s 800m race on Friday. He hopes to inspire other people in his position.

“I can show to my fellow refugees that they have a chance and a hope in life,” Biel told the UNHCR in June.

Linda Bolder of Israel competes against Yolande Bukasa of the Refugee Olympic Team during a Women’s -70kg bout on Day 5 of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games at Carioca Arena 2 on August 10, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Photo by Elsa/Getty Images

Yolande Bukasa, judo

Yolande Bukasa competed in her weight class in Judo on Thursday but didn’t win her first match.

“I’m very happy even having lost, because I had the chance to fight at the Olympics,” she said after her match. “Someday I think there will be a plaque commemorating the fact that I took part in the 2016 Olympics.”

James Chiengjiek of the Olympic Refugee Team talks while attending a press conference given by the Olympic Refugee Team on July 31, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Photo by Ker Robertson/Getty Images

James Nyang Chiengjiek, athletics

James Nyang Ciengjiek, from South Sudan, competed in the men’s 400m Friday and came in last place.

He told rio2016长沙桑拿 that he was enjoying interacting with the other athletes.

“The interaction between the peoples in the athletes’ village is one of the best things of the Olympic Games. It is absolutely incredible,” he said.

Ethiopian runner Yonas Kinde of the Refugee Olympic Team attends a press conference on August 2, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

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Yonas Kinde

Yonas Kinde from Ethiopia competed in the men’s marathon on Sunday. He came in an impressive 90th out of the 140 people who finished the race.

“I normally train every day, but when I heard this news [about the refugee team] I trained two times per day, every day, targeting for these Olympic Games,” he said in June.

“It’s a big motivation.”

Anjaline Lohalith of the Olympic Refugee Team talks while attending a press conference given by the Olympic Refugee Team on July 31, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. ()

Photo by Ker Robertson/Getty Images

Anjelina Nadai Lohalith, athletics

Anjelina Nadai Lohalith, from South Sudan, competed in the women’s 1500m on Friday. She came 40th overall and didn’t qualify.

But she’s said it doesn’t matter how she places in the race, it’s just important she competed.

“It will inspire other refugees because wherever they are they will see that they are not just the ‘other people’,” she told the UNHCR in June. “They will have that encouragement that they can compete in anyway.”

Rose Nathike Lokonyen from the Refugee Olympic Team waits to compete in the Women’s 800m Round 1 heats on Day 12 of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games at the Olympic Stadium on August 17, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

(Photo by Ian Walton/Getty Images)

Rose Nathike Lokonyen, athletics

Rose Nathike Lokonyen, a 23-year-old from South Sudan, raced in the women’s 800-metres on Wednesday, Aug. 17.

She posted a time 2:16.64 seconds and came in 61st.

“My dream, my first priority, is to help my parents and my siblings and then after that to help my fellow refugees,” she told rio2016长沙桑拿.

Yusra Mardini of the Refugee Olympic Team competes in heat one of the Women’s 100m Butterfly on Day 1 of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games at the Olympic Aquatics Stadium on on August 6, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Photo by Lars Baron/Getty Images

Yusra Mardini, swimming

Yusra Mardini may have come 41st overall in women’s 100m butterfly but she was first in her heat, which she said felt “amazing.”

“Everything was amazing. It was the only thing I ever wanted was to compete in the Olympics,” she said after match. “I had a good feeling in the water. Competing with all these great champions is exciting.”

She also competed in women’s 100m freestyle, but didn’t qualify.

Mardini made headlines earlier this year when she and her sister jumped into the water to pull their boat to safety while fleeing Syria.

Donghan Gwak of Korea competes against Popole Misenga of the Refugee Olympic Team during a Men’s -90kg bout on Day 5 of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games at Carioca Arena 2 on August 10, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

(Photo by Elsa/Getty Images)

Popole Misenga, judo

The 24-year-old from the Congo won his first Judo match on Wednesday but lost his second when he was pitted against top-ranked South Korean Dongham Gwak.

That didn’t stop the crowd from chanting his name during the match, though. He told reporters after the match that it was an honour to face a world champion.

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